2nd Lowest Annual Average Sea Ice Volume

The 365–day running average for sea ice volume is still 2nd lowest and lower than 13.51 thousand km³, dropping by about 80 km³ per month. The prognosis suggests we’ll go lower than 2012 for the all–year average, pushing 2012 to #3 for low sea ice.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: Arctic Sea Ice Volume for October 2019 from PIOMAS
Q: How can anyone make an annual average graph?
A: Easy. Use a computer. Add all the ice for the latest 365 days, divide by that number of days.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice we have in 2019 compared to other years.

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

Launched Monday 11/11, CCTV is the Planet’s first 24–hour Climate Channel.

A Christmas Card for Greta

Damned if we Didn’t, Not if we Did | An Unfun Christmas Card to Greta Thunberg: A #COP25 holiday message for Greta T, but just as much for Peter Miller, Kevin Hester and other die–hard Global Dimming alarmists. This final episode of Talking South takes on the so–called McPherson paradox, based on Guy McPherson’s Global Dimming “damned if we do, damned if we don’t” aerosol reduction narrative.

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

Launched Monday 11/11, CCTV is the Planet’s first 24–hour Climate Channel.

2nd Lowest Annual Average Sea Ice Extent

The 365–day running average for sea ice extent is now lower than 9.76 million km² and dropping by about 32 thousand km² per month. The prognosis suggests 2019 will likely be 2nd lowest on record for the all–year average for sea ice cover.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: https://ads.nipr.ac.jp/vishop/#/extent
Q: How can anyone make an annual average graph?
A: Easy. Use a computer. Add all the ice for the latest 365 days, divide by that number of days.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice we have in 2019 compared to other years.

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

Launched Monday 11/11, CCTV is the Planet’s first 24–hour Climate Channel.

2nd Lowest Year-To-Date Average Sea Ice Extent

The Year–To–Date average extent is now 2nd lowest on record. 4 of the 5 lowest years are also the 4 latest years: 2016, 2017, 2018 & 2019. These 4 will knock 2012 down to #5 for the full year.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: https://ads.nipr.ac.jp/vishop/#/extent
Q: How can anyone make a year-to-date average graph?
A: Easy. Use a computer. Add all the ice for every day so far this year, divide by the number of days.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice we have in 2019 compared to other years.

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

Launched Monday 11/11, CCTV is the Planet’s first 24–hour Climate Channel.

2nd Lowest Year-To-Date Average Sea Ice Volume

The Year–To–Date average is still 2nd lowest for sea ice volume in the Arctic. The full year 2019 will likely be 2nd lowest, as the #1 spot held by 2017 is just completely out of the picture. 2020 might have a chance if we have an el–niño.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: Arctic Sea Ice Volume for October 2019 from PIOMAS
Q: How can anyone make a year-to-date average graph?
A: Easy. Use a computer. Add all the ice for every day so far this year, divide by the number of days.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice we have in 2019 compared to other years.

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

Launched Monday 11/11, CCTV is the Planet’s first 24–hour Climate Channel.

3rd Lowest Freeze Season Average | Arctic Sea Ice

This year’s freeze season started September 15th, and since the minimum on the day before that, the season average has been the 3rd lowest on record. 2012 is in the lead, but 2016 is closing in. Ten–Year Trend, though, is still very stubbornly all–time low.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: Arctic Sea Ice Volume for October 2019 from PIOMAS
Q: How can anyone make a decadal average graph?
A: Easy. Use a computer. Add all the ice for the latest 3650 days, divide by that number of days.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice we have in the latest decade compared to the decades before that.

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

Launched Monday 11/11, CCTV is the Planet’s first 24–hour Climate Channel.

7th lowest Arctic sea ice extent refreeze

Arctic sea ice extent refreeze has come 65% of the way from Summer Minimum to full refreeze per December 6th. The lowest extent year ever, 2016, for comparison, was at 61%.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: https://ads.nipr.ac.jp/vishop/#/extent
Q: How can anyone know if there is a full refreeze?
A: Easy. Use a computer. If you have e.g a 10 million km² extent melt, and then the refreeze is also 10 million km², then you have a full, or 100%, refreeze.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice refreezes compared to how much ice that melted away.

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

Launched Monday 11/11, CCTV is the Planet’s first 24–hour Climate Channel.

9th Lowest Arctic sea ice volume refreeze

Arctic sea ice volume refreeze has come 37% of the way from Summer Minimum to full refreeze per December 5th. The lowest volume year ever, 2017, for comparison, was at 42%.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: Arctic Sea Ice Volume for October 2019 from PIOMAS
Q: How can anyone know if there is a full refreeze?
A: Easy. Use a computer. If you have e.g a 17 thousand km³ volume melt, and then the refreeze is also 17 thousand km³, then you have a full, or 100%, refreeze.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice refreezes compared to how much ice that melted away.

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

Launched Monday 11/11, CCTV is the Planet’s first 24–hour Climate Channel.

22% Sea Ice Loss per Decade this Millennium

So, how much ice did we lose from the previous decade to this one? Let’s start with the good news, shall we? We lost only 6.7% flat, binary, 2D surface cover. What the bad news is? Well, we lost 21.9% of the sea ice. So there’s that.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: Ice Volume for October 2019 from PIOMAS and here: https://ads.nipr.ac.jp/vishop/#/extent
Q: How can anyone make a decadal average graph?
A: Easy. Use a computer. Add all the ice for the latest 3650 days, divide by that number of days.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice we have in the latest decade compared to the decades before that.

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

Launched Monday 11/11, CCTV is the Planet’s first 24–hour Climate Channel.

6–month ice–free in 5–16 years?

#GoodHopeModel December 3: Our first ½ year long Arctic Blue Ocean Event could come as early as 2024–35. No sea ice for 6 months, in as little as 5–16 years?

The Good Hope Model: Instead of trying to build a huge model of the entire planet inside a computer, the Good Hope Model applies 40 years of already recorded ice data, or what has already happened, and looks at how rapidly we have been losing ice. Different long & short averages of this decline provide different estimates for the disappearance of Arctic sea ice for 6 consecutive months.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: Arctic Sea Ice Volume for October 2019 from PIOMAS

About that: During the 6th episode of the Talking South talkshow on November 7th last year, Going South predicted that the Deep State / Military Industrial Complex would collapse along with Civilisation during the 2020s or 2030s, and here in August Pentagon confirms this analysis in its own report:

You can learn more about the Good Hope Model on YouTube:

For some of the consequences of a summer half year Blue Ocean Event, press Play:

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

Launched Monday 11/11, CCTV is the Planet’s first 24–hour Climate Channel.