2nd lowest: Annual Average Sea Ice Volume

The 365–day running average for sea ice volume is still 2nd lowest and lower than 13.63 thousand km³, dropping by about 55 km³ per month. The prognosis suggests we’ll go lower than 2012 for the all–year average, pushing 2012 to #3 for low sea ice.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: Arctic Sea Ice Volume for September 2019 from PIOMAS
Q: How can anyone make an annual average graph?
A: Easy. Use a computer. Add all the ice for the latest 365 days, divide by that number of days.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice we have in 2019 compared to other years.

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

Year-To-Date Average Sea Ice Volume

The Year–To–Date average is still 2nd lowest for sea ice volume in the Arctic. The full year 2019 will likely be 2nd lowest, maybe 3rd, and less likely lowest on record. Note the difference of 4,000 km³ back to the 2000s average from the 2010s. That’s climate change for ya.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: Arctic Sea Ice Volume for September 2019 from PIOMAS
Q: How can anyone make a year-to-date average graph?
A: Easy. Use a computer. Add all the ice for every day so far this year, divide by the number of days.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice we have in 2019 compared to other years.

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

Methane Plumes Off Bennett Island, Siberia Explored

Climate denier propaganda in US English and censorship of Western mass media are so much better than Soviet Era propaganda and censorship of Russian mass media…

The above video is item #14 on the YouTube playlist Permafrost Propaganda Wars, of which the below vid is also a member:

«Yale shouldn’t take it upon themselves to spread Darkness and Lies, so should praise any and all information campaigns about these very important issues instead of trying to quell them.»

ibid

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

Year-To-Date Average Sea Ice Extent

The Year–To–Date average extent finally left 2nd lowest for lowest ever sea ice in the Arctic 3 weeks ago. The 4 lowest years are also still the 4 latest years: 2016, 2017, 2018 & 2019. These 4 will knock 2012 down to #5 for the full year.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: https://ads.nipr.ac.jp/vishop/#/extent
Q: How can anyone make a year-to-date average graph?
A: Easy. Use a computer. Add all the ice for every day so far this year, divide by the number of days.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice we have in 2019 compared to other years.

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

Arctic sea ice extent refreeze

Arctic sea ice extent refreeze has come 9% of the way from Summer Minimum to full refreeze per October 13th. The lowest extent year ever, 2016, for comparison, was at 14%.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: https://ads.nipr.ac.jp/vishop/#/extent
Q: How can anyone know if there is a full refreeze?
A: Easy. Use a computer. If you have e.g a 10 million km² extent melt, and then the refreeze is also 10 million km², then you have a full, or 100%, refreeze.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice refreezes compared to how much ice that melted away.

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

Arctic sea ice volume refreeze

Arctic sea ice volume refreeze has come 3% of the way from Summer Minimum to full refreeze per October 10th. The lowest volume year ever, 2017, for comparison, was at 6%.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: Arctic Sea Ice Volume for September 2019 from PIOMAS
Q: How can anyone know if there is a full refreeze?
A: Easy. Use a computer. If you have e.g a 17 thousand km³ volume melt, and then the refreeze is also 17 thousand km³, then you have a full, or 100%, refreeze.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice refreezes compared to how much ice that melted away.

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

Arctic Sea Ice Volume for September 2019 from PIOMAS

 2019 244   4.154
 2019 245   4.132
 2019 246   4.101
 2019 247   4.097
 2019 248   4.080
 2019 249   4.072
 2019 250   4.061
 2019 251   4.067
 2019 252   4.064
 2019 253   4.064
 2019 254   4.067
 2019 255   4.062
 2019 256   4.064
 2019 257   4.058
 2019 258   4.070
 2019 259   4.080
 2019 260   4.087
 2019 261   4.114
 2019 262   4.146
 2019 263   4.174
 2019 264   4.230
 2019 265   4.287
 2019 266   4.332
 2019 267   4.365
 2019 268   4.395
 2019 269   4.418
 2019 270   4.442
 2019 271   4.491
 2019 272   4.531
 2019 273   4.568

Columns are Year, Day # and sea ice volume in thousand km³. So for instance volume for September 30th is 4,568 km³. If you want the full dataset since January 1, 1979, it’s available from UW.

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

22% Sea Ice Loss per Decade this Millennium?

So how much ice did we lose from the previous decade to this one? Let’s start with the good news, shall we? We lost only 6.5% flat, 2D surface cover. What the bad news is? Well, we lost 21.7% of the sea ice. So there’s that.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: Ice Volume for August 2019 from PIOMAS and here: https://ads.nipr.ac.jp/vishop/#/extent
Q: How can anyone make a decadal average graph?
A: Easy. Use a computer. Add all the ice for the latest 3650 days, divide by that number of days.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice we have in the latest decade compared to the decades before that.

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

½ Year Arctic Blue Ocean Estimates

#GoodHopeModel October 5: Our first ½ year long Arctic Blue Ocean Event could come as early as 2024–35. No sea ice for 6 months, in as little as 5–16 years?

The Good Hope Model: Instead of trying to build a huge model of the entire planet inside a computer, the Good Hope Model applies 40 years of already recorded ice data, or what has already happened, and looks at how rapidly we have been losing ice. Different long & short averages of this decline provide different estimates for the disappearance of Arctic sea ice for 6 consecutive months.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: Arctic Sea Ice Volume for August 2019 from PIOMAS

You can learn more about the Good Hope Model on YouTube:

For some of the consequences of a summer half year Blue Ocean Event, press Play:

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

Annual Average Sea Ice Extent

The 365–day running average for sea ice extent is now lower than 9.84 million km² and dropping by about 35 thousand km² per month. The prognosis suggests 2019 will be 2nd lowest on record for the all–year average.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: https://ads.nipr.ac.jp/vishop/#/extent
Q: How can anyone make an annual average graph?
A: Easy. Use a computer. Add all the ice for the latest 365 days, divide by that number of days.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice we have in 2019 compared to other years.

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.