2nd Lowest Annual Average Sea Ice Volume

The 365–day running average for sea ice volume is still 2nd lowest and lower than 13.57 thousand km³, dropping by about 70 km³ per month. The prognosis suggests we’ll go lower than 2012 for the all–year average, pushing 2012 to #3 for low sea ice.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: Arctic Sea Ice Volume for October 2019 from PIOMAS
Q: How can anyone make an annual average graph?
A: Easy. Use a computer. Add all the ice for the latest 365 days, divide by that number of days.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice we have in 2019 compared to other years.

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

Launched Monday 11/11, CCTV is the Planet’s first 24–hour Climate Channel.

All–Time Low Annual Average Sea Ice Extent

The 365–day running average for sea ice extent is now lower than 9.78 million km² and dropping by about 36 thousand km² per month. The prognosis suggests 2019 will likely be 2nd lowest on record for the all–year average for sea ice cover.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: https://ads.nipr.ac.jp/vishop/#/extent
Q: How can anyone make an annual average graph?
A: Easy. Use a computer. Add all the ice for the latest 365 days, divide by that number of days.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice we have in 2019 compared to other years.

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

Launched Monday 11/11, CCTV is the Planet’s first 24–hour Climate Channel.

All–Time Low Year-To-Date Average Sea Ice Extent

The Year–To–Date average extent has been all–time low now since late September. 4 of the 5 lowest years are also the 4 latest years: 2016, 2017, 2018 & 2019. These 4 will knock 2012 down to #5 for the full year.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: https://ads.nipr.ac.jp/vishop/#/extent
Q: How can anyone make a year-to-date average graph?
A: Easy. Use a computer. Add all the ice for every day so far this year, divide by the number of days.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice we have in 2019 compared to other years.

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

Launched Monday 11/11, CCTV is the Planet’s first 24–hour Climate Channel.

2nd Lowest Year-To-Date Average Sea Ice Volume

The Year–To–Date average is still 2nd lowest for sea ice volume in the Arctic. The full year 2019 will likely be 2nd lowest, maybe 3rd, and the fight is really with 2012, now 3rd.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: Arctic Sea Ice Volume for October 2019 from PIOMAS
Q: How can anyone make a year-to-date average graph?
A: Easy. Use a computer. Add all the ice for every day so far this year, divide by the number of days.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice we have in 2019 compared to other years.

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

Launched Monday 11/11, CCTV is the Planet’s first 24–hour Climate Channel.

2nd lowest Freeze Season Average | Arctic Sea Ice Volume

This year’s freeze season started September 15th, and since the minimum on the day before that, the season average has been the 2nd lowest on record. 2012 is in the lead, and 2016 is 3rd lowest. Ten–Year Trend, though, is still very stubbornly all–time low.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: Arctic Sea Ice Volume for October 2019 from PIOMAS
Q: How can anyone make a decadal average graph?
A: Easy. Use a computer. Add all the ice for the latest 3650 days, divide by that number of days.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice we have in the latest decade compared to the decades before that.

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

Launched Monday, on 11/11, CCTV is the Planet’s first 24–hour Climate Channel.

4–Yr Average at New All–Time Low

In the Arctic, the sea ice volume 4-yr average reached a new record low this weekend due to climate change. The new milestone was 13.5 thousand km³.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: Arctic Sea Ice Volume for October 2019 from PIOMAS
Q: How can anyone make a 4–year average graph?
A: Easy. Use a computer. Add all the ice for the latest 4×365 days, divide by that number of days.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice we have in the latest 4–year period compared to the 4–year periods before that.

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

Launched Monday, on 11/11, CCTV is the Planet’s first 24–hour Climate Channel.

6–Yr Average at New All–Time Low

In the Arctic, the sea ice volume 6-yr average reached a new record low on Guy Fawkes Day due to climate change. The new milestone was 14.1 thousand km³.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: Arctic Sea Ice Volume for October 2019 from PIOMAS
Q: How can anyone make a 6–year average graph?
A: Easy. Use a computer. Add all the ice for the latest 6×365 days, divide by that number of days.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice we have in the latest 6–year period compared to the 6–year periods before that.

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

Launched last night, on 11/11, CCTV is the Planet’s first 24–hour Climate Channel.

5–Yr Average at New All–Time Low

In the Arctic, the sea ice volume 5-yr average reached a new record low yesterday due to climate change. The new milestone was 13.9 thousand km³.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: Arctic Sea Ice Volume for October 2019 from PIOMAS
Q: How can anyone make a 5–year average graph?
A: Easy. Use a computer. Add all the ice for the latest 5×365 days, divide by that number of days.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice we have in the latest 5–year period compared to the 5–year periods before that.

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

Arctic Sea Ice Volume for October 2019 from PIOMAS

 2019 274   4.607
 2019 275   4.658
 2019 276   4.695
 2019 277   4.724
 2019 278   4.758
 2019 279   4.769
 2019 280   4.752
 2019 281   4.760
 2019 282   4.790
 2019 283   4.841
 2019 284   4.898
 2019 285   4.969
 2019 286   5.037
 2019 287   5.081
 2019 288   5.162
 2019 289   5.232
 2019 290   5.313
 2019 291   5.389
 2019 292   5.469
 2019 293   5.531
 2019 294   5.557
 2019 295   5.592
 2019 296   5.654
 2019 297   5.730
 2019 298   5.839
 2019 299   5.960
 2019 300   6.084
 2019 301   6.180
 2019 302   6.296
 2019 303   6.399
 2019 304   6.516
Columns are Year, Day # and sea ice volume in thousand km³. So for instance volume for October 31st is 6,516 km³. If you want the full dataset since January 1, 1979, it’s available from UW.

It is widely believed that this 11/11 release of the ice volume data is the most laid–back ever from the US–Americans, at least in recent history. November 11th, after all, represents an 11–41 day wait for the volume data for each of the days of October, on average that’s 26 days of waiting to know the sea ice volume of any given day. For JAXA sea ice extent the wait is 1 day. Maybe it’s time to let the old computers at UW go with a pension plan, and go buy some new ones that can work every day?

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

8th lowest Arctic sea ice extent refreeze

Arctic sea ice extent refreeze has come 44% of the way from Summer Minimum to full refreeze per November 9th. The lowest extent year ever, 2016, for comparison, was at 47%.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: https://ads.nipr.ac.jp/vishop/#/extent
Q: How can anyone know if there is a full refreeze?
A: Easy. Use a computer. If you have e.g a 10 million km² extent melt, and then the refreeze is also 10 million km², then you have a full, or 100%, refreeze.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice refreezes compared to how much ice that melted away.

Due in large part to ongoing Collapse of Arctic Sea Ice our Frozen Earth is Going South.

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