Year-To-Date Average Sea Ice Volume

The average for the year for Arctic sea ice volume is still 6th lowest per March 4th, but fast approaching 7th lowest. These are however still early days, and a 63–day average, while much more reliable than just a daily figure, is a lot less indicative of where the year is going than, say, a 100–day or 200–day average. This could still go either way!

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: http://psc.apl.uw.edu/research/projects/arctic-sea-ice-volume-anomaly/data/
Q: How can anyone make a year-to-date average graph?
A: Easy. Use a computer. Add all the ice for every day so far this year, divide by the number of days.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice we have in 2019 compared to other years.

Year-To-Date Average Sea Ice Extent

The average for the year for Arctic sea ice extent is up from 5th to 6th lowest per March 3rd. These are however still early days, and a 62–day average, while much more reliable than just a daily figure, is a lot less indicative of where the year is going than, say, a 100–day or 200–day average. This could still go either way!

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: https://ads.nipr.ac.jp/vishop/#/extent
Q: How can anyone make a year-to-date average graph?
A: Easy. Use a computer. Add all the ice for every day so far this year, divide by the number of days.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice we have in 2019 compared to other years.

Arctic sea ice volume refreeze

Arctic sea ice volume refreeze has come 90% of the way since Summer Minimum per March 1st. The lowest volume year ever, 2017, by the same date, was at 78%.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: http://psc.apl.uw.edu/research/projects/arctic-sea-ice-volume-anomaly/data/
Q: How can anyone know if there is a full refreeze?
A: Easy. Use a computer. If you have e.g a 17 thousand km³ volume melt, and then the refreeze is also 17 thousand km³, then you have a full, or 100%, refreeze.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know how much ice refreezes compared to how much ice that melted away.

Arctic sea ice extent meltdown

Arctic sea ice extent meltdown has come 2% of the way from Winter Maximum to a Blue Ocean Event per February 28th. The lowest extent year ever, 2016, by the same date, was still in refreeze, at 100%.

Q: Where’s the data source for this plot?
A: Here: https://ads.nipr.ac.jp/vishop/#/extent
Q: How can anyone know if there is a Blue Ocean Event?
A: Easy. Use a computer. If you have less than 1 million km² sea ice extent in the Arctic, then you have a Blue Ocean Event.
Q: Why would I even do that?
A: Let’s say you want to know when the Arctic Ocean goes ice–free. Basing this on satellite measurements instead of gut feeling makes your conversations more interesting.